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Itraconazole
 
SELECT REF DESCRIPTION MANUFACTURER PACK SIZE STRENGTH OUR PRICE
J556 Itraconazole Generic 4 caps 100 mg $ 31.73
P930 Sporanox (Itraconazole) Johnson & Johnson 4 caps 100 mg $ 29.38
P929 Canditral (Itraconazole) Glenmark 4 caps 100 mg $ 20.26
Prices are per pack and not per tab/ cap.. eg: if the pack size is 10 tabs and price is $2.75 then for 100 tabs the price would be $27.50
What is itraconazole?
Itraconazole is an antifungal antibiotic.

Itraconazole is used to treat infections caused by fungus, which can invade any part of the body including the lungs, mouth or throat, toenails, or fingernails.

Itraconazole may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about itraconazole?
Do not take this medication if you are allergic to itraconazole or similar medications such as fluconazole (Diflucan) or ketoconazole (Nizoral), if you have ever had congestive heart failure, or if you are pregnant or may become pregnant during treatment.

You should not take itraconazole together with cisapride (Propulsid), dihydroedrgotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), dofetilide (Tikosyn), ergonavine (Ergotrate), ergotamine (Ergomar), lovastatin (Altocor, Altoprev, Mevacor), methylergonovine (Methergine), midazolam (Versed), nisoldipine (Sular), pimozide (Orap), quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release), simvastatin (Zocor), or triazolam (Halcion).

Other drugs that should not be taken together with itraconazole include astemizole (Hismanal), or levomethadyl Orlaam) (these drugs are no longer available in the U.S.).

There are many other medicines that can interact with itraconazole. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

Before taking itraconazole, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, a history of stroke, a heart rhythm disorder, kidney or liver disease, a breathing disorder, cystic fibrosis, or a history of "Long QT syndrome."

Itraconazole capsules should not be used in place of itraconazole oral solution (liquid) if that is what your doctor has prescribed. Make sure you have received the correct type of this medication at the pharmacy and ask the pharmacist if you have any questions. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking itraconazole?
Do not take this medication if you are allergic to itraconazole or similar medications such as fluconazole (Diflucan) or ketoconazole (Nizoral), if you have ever had congestive heart failure, or if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant during treatment. The following drugs should not be taken together with itraconazole:

cisapride (Propulsid);

dofetilide (Tikosyn);

nisoldipine (Sular);

pimozide (Orap);

quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release);

lovastatin (Altocor, Altoprev, Mevacor) or simvastatin (Zocor);

midazolam (Versed) or triazolam (Halcion);

ergot medicines such as dihydroedrgotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), ergonavine (Ergotrate), ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Ercaf, Migergot), or methylergonovine (Methergine); or

(these drugs are no longer available in the U.S.) astemizole (Hismanal), or levomethadyl Orlaam).

Before taking itraconazole, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

heart disease, a heart rhythm disorder, circulation problems, or a history of stroke;

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing disorder;

kidney disease;

liver disease;

cystic fibrosis; or

a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome."

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take itraconazole.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Itraconazole passes into breast milk and can harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take itraconazole?
Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The itraconazole tablet should be taken after a full meal. Take itraconazole oral solution (liquid) on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal. Swish the liquid in your mouth for several seconds before swallowing it.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Itraconazole capsules should not be used in place of itraconazole oral solution (liquid) if that is what your doctor has prescribed. Make sure you have received the correct type of this medication at the pharmacy and ask the pharmacist if you have any questions. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your liver function may need to be checked with blood tests on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store itraconazole at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of an itraconazole overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking itraconazole?
Avoid taking antacids or stomach acid reducers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Axid, Zantac, and others) within 1 hour before or 2 hours after you take itraconazole. These medications can make it harder for your body to absorb itraconazole.

Itraconazole side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fever;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain;

problems with hearing;

numbness or tingly feeling;

pain or burning when you urinate; or

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

diarrhea, constipation, mild stomach pain;

mild itching or skin rash;

headache, dizziness; or

runny nose or other cold symptoms.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

Itraconazole Dosing Information
Usual Adult Dose for Blastomycosis:

IV: 200 mg via IV infusion (administered over 1 hour) twice a day for 4 doses, followed by 200 mg once a day
The safety and efficacy of IV itraconazole use exceeding 14 days is unknown.

Capsules: 200 mg orally once a day; if no obvious improvement or if evidence of progressive fungal disease, the dose may be increased in 100 mg increments to a maximum of 400 mg/day

Doses greater than 200 mg/day should be given in 2 divided doses.

Total itraconazole therapy (IV infusion followed by capsules) should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided. Some clinicians recommend therapy for at least 12 months for disseminated or chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis and 6 to 12 months for blastomycosis.

Usual Adult Dose for Histoplasmosis:

IV: 200 mg via IV infusion (administered over 1 hour) twice a day for 4 doses, followed by 200 mg once a day
The safety and efficacy of IV itraconazole use exceeding 14 days is unknown.

Capsules: 200 mg orally once a day; if no obvious improvement or if evidence of progressive fungal disease, the dose may be increased in 100 mg increments to a maximum of 400 mg/day

Doses greater than 200 mg/day should be given in 2 divided doses.

Total itraconazole therapy (IV infusion followed by capsules) should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided. Some clinicians recommend therapy for at least 12 months for disseminated or chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis and 6 to 12 months for blastomycosis.

Usual Adult Dose for Febrile Neutropenia:

Empiric Therapy in Febrile, Neutropenic Patients with Suspected Fungal Infections (ETFN): 200 mg via IV infusion (administered over 1 hour) twice a day for 4 doses, followed by 200 mg once a day for up to 14 days

Treatment should be continued with 200 mg of itraconazole oral solution administered twice a day until resolution of clinically significant neutropenia.

The safety and efficacy of itraconazole use exceeding 28 days in ETFN is unknown.

Usual Adult Dose for Aspergillosis -- Aspergilloma:

IV: 200 mg via IV infusion (administered over 1 hour) twice a day for 4 doses, followed by 200 mg once a day
The safety and efficacy of IV itraconazole use exceeding 14 days is unknown.

Capsules: 200 to 400 mg orally per day in one or two divided doses

Total itraconazole therapy (IV infusion followed by capsules) should be continued for a minimum of 3 months and until clinical parameters and laboratory tests indicate the active fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Toenail:

Toenails with or without fingernail involvement:
Capsules: 200 mg orally once a day for 12 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Oral Thrush:

Oral solution:
Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 200 mg orally once a day for 1 to 2 weeks

Clinical signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis generally resolve within several days. Only the oral solution has been demonstrated effective for oral and/or esophageal candidiasis.

Oropharyngeal candidiasis unresponsive/refractory to treatment with fluconazole tablets: 100 mg orally twice a day

Clinical response will be seen in 2 to 4 weeks in patients responding to therapy. Patients may be expected to relapse shortly after discontinuing therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

Oral solution: 100 mg orally once a day for a minimum of 3 weeks
Treatment should continue for 2 weeks following resolution of symptoms. Doses up to 200 mg/day may be used.

Only the oral solution has been demonstrated effective for oral and/or esophageal candidiasis.

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis -- Fingernail:

Fingernails only:
Capsules: 200 mg orally twice a day for 1 week; the dosing should be repeated after 3 weeks without itraconazole for a total of 2 treatment pulses

Usual Adult Dose for Candida Urinary Tract Infection:

200 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 100 mg increments to 400 mg/day
Therapy should be continued for 1 to 2 weeks and until tests indicate fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Candidemia:

200 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 100 mg increments to 400 mg/day
Therapy should be continued for 1 to 2 weeks and until tests indicate fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis:

200 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 100 mg increments to 400 mg/day
Therapy should be continued for at least 6 months and until tests indicate fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Paracoccidioidomycosis:

200 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 100 mg increments to 400 mg/day
Therapy should be continued for at least 6 months and until tests indicate fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Dermatophytosis:

200 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 100 mg increments to 400 mg/day
Therapy should be continued for at least 4 weeks and until tests indicate fungal infection has subsided.

Usual Adult Dose for Sporotrichosis:

Capsules:
Cutaneous or lymphonodular infection: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day
Osteoarticular or pulmonary infection: 200 mg to 300 mg orally 2 times a day

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcosis:

Capsules: 200 to 400 mg orally each day
Doses greater than 200 mg daily should be given in divided doses. The 400 mg/day dose is recommended for more severe infection and infection with central nervous system involvement in an HIV-infected patient.

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Versicolor:

Capsules: 200 mg orally 2 times a day

Usual Adult Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis:

Capsules: 200 mg orally 2 times a day for 1 day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Histoplasmosis:

HIV-infected infants and children:
Prophylaxis for first episode: 2 to 5 mg/kg orally every 12 to 24 hours
Prophylaxis for recurrence: 2 to 5 mg/kg orally every 12 to 48 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tinea Capitis:

Continuous regimen:
Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton violaceum (endothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 2 to 4 weeks
Microsporum canis (ectothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 4 to 6 weeks

Pulse regimen:
Capsules:
T tonsurans, T violaceum (endothrix), and M canis (ectothrix) species: 5 mg/kg/day orally for 1 week followed by a 3-week period off of treatment

Patient is evaluated on week 4 from the start of therapy for clinical response. If evidence of tinea capitis remains, additional pulse therapies may be required up to a maximum of 3 pulses.

What other drugs will affect itraconazole?
Many drugs can interact with itraconazole. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

cancer medications;

cholesterol medications such as atorvastatin (Lipitor);

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral);

diabetes medication you take by mouth;

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

disopyramide (Norpace);

fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic);

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater, Rifamate), or rifapentine (Priftin);

sirolimus (Rapamune) or tacrolimus (Prograf);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), clotrimazole (Mycelex Troche), erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), ketoconazole (Nizoral), telithromycin (Ketek), troleandomycin (Tao), or voriconazole (Vfend);

an antidepressant such as nefazodone, paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft);

a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

heart or blood pressure medications such as amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), efavirenz (Sustiva), etravirine (Intelence), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), nevirapine (Viramune), saquinavir (Invirase, Fortovase), or ritonavir (Norvir);

a sedative such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), felbamate (Felbatol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), or phenytoin (Dilantin), or primidone (Mysoline).

This list is not complete and there are many other medicines that can interact with itraconazole.

Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about itraconazole.

 

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